God communicates with us in unique and intentional ways. His primary source of conversing with us is His Word, the Bible. This is the main impetus behind the Renovate Movement; so that each of us will develop the regular habit of absorbing the Word in order to hear from the Giver of Life. Beyond this truth, God also speaks through His creation (as in the beauty of a sunrise, the majesty of the heavens, etc.), through life circumstances (as in the trials we face or the blessings we receive), or through the voices of others who enter our lives.

Today’s reflection centers on God’s voice heard through the vehicle of others intervening on His behalf. Based on the scripture I’ve chosen to reflect upon, I will refer to such people as an “Abigail.” Have you ever encountered an Abigail in your life? Have you been used by our Creator to be an Abigail in someone else’s life? You may be wondering what is meant by this. In the story of David, after having been anointed king of Israel by the prophet Samuel, he was pursued in the wilderness by Saul and his armies out of jealousy because God had rejected Saul as king and chosen David. Saul was seeking to kill David. During this period, David and his men had cared for and protected the shepherds of a wealthy man named Nabal (meaning foolish) while they were with them in the wilderness. Assuming that Nabal would repay the kindness with provisions for he and his men, David sends young men from his group to inquire for the support. Nabal quickly and rudely rejects the request and when the news is returned to David, he becomes furious. He commands his mighty men to strap on their swords and, in true warrior fashion, intends to slaughter Nabal and all of his servants. One of the shepherds who had received David’s protection alerts Abigail, the wife of Nabal; who goes into action without delay. She has provisions prepared and meets David on the way to carry out his plan. The May 27th Old Testament reading from our devotional Bible records the words of Abigail to David:

And she fell at his feet and said, “On me alone, my lord, be the blame. And please let your maidservant speak to you, and listen to the words of your maidservant. Please do not let my lord pay attention to this worthless man, Nabal, for as his name is, so is he. Nabal is his name and folly is with him; but I your maidservant did not see the young men of my lord whom you sent. Now therefore, my lord, as the LORD lives, and as your soul lives, since the LORD has restrained you from shedding blood, and from avenging yourself by your own hand, now then let your enemies, and those who seek evil against my lord, be as Nabal. And now let this gift which your maidservant has brought to my lord be given to the young men who accompany my lord. Please forgive the transgression of your maidservant; for the LORD will certainly make for my lord an enduring house, because my lord is fighting the battles of the LORD, and evil shall not be found in you all your days.”

“And should anyone rise up to pursue you and to seek your life, then the life of my lord shall be bound in the bundle of the living with the LORD your God; but the lives of your enemies He will sling out as from the hollow of a sling. And it shall come about when the LORD shall do for my lord according to all the good that He has spoken concerning you, and shall appoint you ruler over Israel, that this will not cause grief or a troubled heart to my lord, both by having shed blood without cause and by my lord having avenged himself. When the LORD shall deal well with my lord, then remember your maidservant.” (1 Samuel 25:24-31, NASB)

Abigail risks much to intervene. Yet notice her confidence that she is speaking for the LORD. She understands the bigger purpose behind her action; namely to stop David, as the anointed king of Israel, from the sin of bloodshed and taking vengeance upon himself instead of leaving it to God. Had David not received the information well, Abigail could have been cut down as was intended for Nabal. Yet, as a “man after God’s own heart,” observe David’s reaction:

Then David said to Abigail, “Blessed be the LORD God of Israel, who sent you this day to meet me, and blessed be your discernment, and blessed be you, who have kept me this day from bloodshed, and from avenging myself by my own hand.” (1 Samuel 25:32-33, NASB)

David recognizes the voice of God. He stands convicted by his actions. As the narrative unfolds, Nabal, in essence, has a stroke and dies when he hears what almost befell him. Abigail’s request of David to be a beneficiary of God’s well dealings with him ends in marriage to David after Nabal’s death.

The lesson for us is to be self-less enough to receive Godly correction from another person, an Abigail, when we need it. Furthermore, we must be open and sufficiently brave in faith to give caring and humble admonishment to someone who needs it when they go astray; when they are in danger of spiritual destruction.

Hear the voice of or actually be “an Abigail” when necessary.

In Christ,

Pastor Rob